Diff

Schema matching and mapping

Authors: 
Bellahsène, Z; Bonifati, A; Rahm, E
Year: 
2011
Venue: 
Springer

The book edited by Bellahsene, Bonifati and Rahm provides an overview of the ways in which the schema and ontology matching and mapping tools have addressed the above requirements and points to the open technical challenges. The contributions from leading experts are structured into three parts: large-scale and knowledge-driven schema matching, quality-driven schema mapping and evolution, and evaluation and tuning of matching tasks.

GOMMA: A Component-based Infrastructure for managing and analyzing Life Science Ontologies and their Evolution

Authors: 
Kirsten, T.; Gross, A.; Hartung, M.; Rahm, E.
Year: 
2011
Venue: 
Journal of Biomedical Semantics 2011, 2:6

Background
Ontologies are increasingly used to structure and semantically describe entities of domains, such as genes and proteins in life sciences. Their increasing size and the high frequency of updates resulting in a large set of ontology versions necessitates efficient management and analysis of this data.

Results

COnto-Diff : Generation of Complex Evolution Mappings for Life Science Ontologies

Authors: 
Hartung, M.; Gross, A.; Rahm, E.
Year: 
2012
Venue: 
Journal of Biomedical Informatics

Life science ontologies evolve frequently to meet new requirements or to better reflect the current domain knowledge. The development and adaptation of large and complex ontologies is typically performed collaboratively by several curators. To effectively manage the evolution of ontologies it is essential to identify the difference (Diff) between ontology versions. Such a Diff supports the synchronization of changes in collaborative curation, the adaptation of dependent data such as annotations, and ontology version management.

CODEX: Exploration of semantic changes between ontology versions

Authors: 
Hartung, M.; Groß, A.; Rahm, E.
Year: 
2012
Venue: 
Bioinformatics 28 (6): 895-896

Summary: Life science ontologies substantially change over time to meet the requirements of their users and to include the newest domain knowledge. Thus, an important task is to know what has been modified between two versions of an ontology (diff ). This diff should contain all performed changes as compact and understandable as possible. We present CODEX (Complex Ontology Diff Explorer), a tool that allows determining semantic changes between two versions of an ontology which users can interactively analyze in multiple ways.

Evolution von Ontologien in den Lebenswissenschaften

Authors: 
Hartung, M.
Year: 
2011

In den Lebenswissenschaften haben sich Ontologien in den letzten Jahren auf breiter Front durchgesetzt und sind in vielen Anwendungs- und Analyseszenarien kaum mehr wegzudenken. So etablierten sich nach und nach immer mehr domänenspezifische Ontologien, z.B. Anatomie-Ontologien oder Ontologien zur Beschreibung der Funktionen von Genen oder Proteinen. Da das Wissen in den Lebenswissenschaften sich rapide ändert und weiterentwickelt, müssen die entsprechenden Ontologien ständig angepasst und verändert werden, um einen möglichst aktuellen Wissensstand zu repräsentieren.

Rule-based Generation of Diff Evolution Mappings between Ontology Versions

Authors: 
Hartung, M; Gross, A; Rahm, E
Year: 
2010
Venue: 
Arxiv preprint arXiv:1010.0122, Univ. of Leipzig, 2010

Ontologies such as taxonomies, product catalogs or
web directories are heavily used and hence evolve frequently
to meet new requirements or to better reflect the current instance
data of a domain. To effectively manage the evolution
of ontologies it is essential to identify the difference (Diff) between
two ontology versions. We propose a novel approach to
determine an expressive and invertible diff evolution mapping
between given versions of an ontology. Our approach utilizes
the result of a match operation to determine an evolution

Galaxy: Encouraging data sharing among sources with schema variants

Authors: 
Mork, P; Seligman, L; Morse, M.;Rosenthal, A;
Year: 
2009
Venue: 
Proc. ICDE Conf. (Demo paper)

This demonstration presents Galaxy, a schema manager that facilitates easy and correct data sharing among autonomous but related, evolving data sources. Galaxy reduces heterogeneity by helping database developers identify, reuse, customize, and advertise related schema components. The central idea is that as schemata are customized, Galaxy maintains a derivation graph, and exploits it for matching, data exchange, discovery, and multidatabase query over the “galaxy” of related data sources.

Understanding ontology evolution: A change detection approach

Authors: 
Plessers, P; Troyer, O De; Casteleyn, S
Year: 
2007
Venue: 
Web Semantics: Science, Services and Agents on the World Wide Web, Vol. 5 (1)

In this article, we propose a change detection approach in the context of an ontology evolution framework for OWL DL ontologies. The framework allows ontology engineers to request and apply changes to the ontology they manage. Furthermore, the framework assures that the ontology and its depending artifacts remain consistent after changes have been applied. Innovative is that the framework includes a change detection mechanism that allows generating automatically a detailed overview of changes that have occurred based on a set of change definitions.

DSMDiff: A Differentiation Tool for Domain-Specific Models

Authors: 
Lin, Yuehua; Gray, Jeff ; Jouault, Frédéric
Year: 
2007
Venue: 
European Journal of Information Systems

Model differentiation techniques, which provide the capability to identify mappings and
differences between models, are essential to many model development and management
practices. There has been initial research toward model differentiation applied to UML diagrams,
but differentiation of domain-specific models has not been explored deeply in the modeling
community. Traditional modeling practice using the UML relies on a single fixed generalpurpose
language (i.e., all UML diagrams conform to a single metamodel). In contrast, Domain-

Meaningful change detection in structured data

Authors: 
Sudarshan, C. S.; Garcia-Molina, H.
Year: 
1997
Venue: 
Proc. of the 1997 ACM SIGMOD Intl Conf. on Management of data

Detecting changes by comparing data snapshots is an important requirement for difference queries, active databases, and version and configuration management. In this paper we focus on detecting meaningful changes in hierarchically structured data, such as nested-object data. This problem is much more challenging than the corresponding one for relational or flat-file data.

Change detection in hierarchically structured information

Authors: 
Sudarshan, C. S.; Rajaraman, A.; Garcia-Molina, H.; Widom, J.
Year: 
1996
Venue: 
Proc. of the 1996 ACM SIGMOD Intl Conf. on Management of data

Detecting and representing changes to data is important for active databases, data warehousing, view maintenance, and version and configuration management. Most previous work in change management has dealt with flat-file and relational data; we focus on hierarchically structured data. Since in many cases changes must be computed from old and new versions of the data, we define the hierarchical change detection problem as the problem of finding a \"minimum-cost edit script\" that transforms one data tree to another, and we present efficient algorithms for computing such an edit script.

On the Editing Distance between Undirected Acyclic Graphs and Related Problems

Authors: 
Zhang, K.; Wang, J. T. L.; Shasha, D.
Year: 
1995
Venue: 
Combinatorial Pattern Matching, 6th Annual Symposium, CPM 95

This paper generalizes the work on the edit distance between
strings [6, 11, 13, 16, 20, 21, 25] and trees [19, 28, 29]. Various
kinds of constrained and
generalized edit distance on strings and trees have been developed
[1, 9, 10, 17, 27]. Our degree-2
distance, when applied to unordered trees, is a restricted form of
the constrained distance previously
reported in [27]. When applied to ordered trees, the degree-2
distance is a generalized
measure of the constrained distance originated from Selkow [17],
though our algorithm has the

An O(ND) Difference Algorithm and Its Variations

Authors: 
Myers, E. W.
Year: 
1986
Venue: 
Algorithmica, Vol.1, Num.2, 1986

The problems of finding a longest common subsequence of two sequences A and B and a shortest edit script
for transforming A into B have long been known to be dual problems. In this paper, they are shown to be
equivalent to finding a shortest/longest path in an edit graph. Using this perspective, a simple O(ND) time
and space algorithm is developed where N is the sum of the lengths of A and B and D is the size of the
minimum edit script for A and B. The algorithm performs well when differences are small (sequences are

PromptDiff: A fixed-point algorithm for comparing ontology versions

Authors: 
Noy, N.F.; Musen, M.A.
Year: 
2002
Venue: 
18th National Conference on Artificial Intelligence (AAAI-

As ontology development becomes a more ubiquitous and collaborative process, the developers face the problem of maintaining versions of ontologies akin to maintaining versions of software code in large software projects. Versioning systems for software code provide mechanisms for tracking versions, checking out versions for editing, comparing different versions, and so on. We can directly reuse many of these mechanisms for ontology versioning. However, version comparison for code is based on comparing text files—an approach that does not work for comparing ontologies.

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